Saturday, May 28, 2016

Books Read In The Past Week




Books read for the first time are marked with a #
Books are listed by author (or series creator),
 and not necessarily in the order read.


"You're A Brick, Angela! 
A New Look At Girls' Fiction From 1839-1975"
by Mary Cadogan and Patricia Craig[nonfiction]
it's been years since I read this.  I'd forgotten
that these authors disparaged some of my favorite books.

"Eleanor H. Porter's 
Pollyanna
A Children's Classic at 100" #
edited by Roxanne Harde and Lydia Kokkola
[nonfiction]
a collection of articles

"Claude Lightfoot
or How the Problem Was Solved"
"That Football Game
and What Came Of It"
by Fr. Francis J. Finn, S.J.
[children's fiction]
(free online books)
reserved for Sunday


"Heaven To Betsy"  
by Maud Hart Lovelace
[YA fiction]
(openlibrary.org loan)
my copy fell apart

"Every Day Is A Gift
Minute Meditations for Every Day
Taken From the Holy Bible
and the Writings of the Saints"
Introduction by Rev. Frederick Schroeder 
 daily devotional reading for 2016
 
 


"Dobry"
by Monica Shannon
[children's fiction]

"90% Off-  Every Day!" #
by Diana Tenes
[nonfiction, autobiographical (she writes about her experiences
shopping for bargain)]
(Kindle Book)

"in-between Miya" #
by Yoshiko Uchida
[children's fiction]
(openlibrary.org loan)

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Books Read In The Past Week



Books read for the first time are marked with a #
Books are listed by author (or series creator),
 and not necessarily in the order read.

"Little Women"
by Louisa May Alcott
[fiction]
(In Kindle book, "The Complete Works of Louisa May Alcott")

"House At The Corner" #
by Enid Blyton
[children's fiction]
the first Blyton book I've read
that is not part of a series, and
not set in a boarding school, although,
to my great delight, one of those schools
is mentioned!

"Eleanor H. Porter's 
Pollyanna
A Children's Classic at 100" #
edited by Roxanne Harde and Lydia Kokkola
[nonfiction]
a collection of articles

"Claude Lightfoot
or How the Problem Was Solved"
by Fr. Francis J. Finn, S.J.
[children's fiction]
(free online book)
reserved for Sunday

"Louisa May Alcott
Author, Nurse, Suffragette"#
by Carol Greene
[children's biography]
(openlibrary.org loan)

"The Wizzle War"
a slightly revised version
of The War With Mr. Wizzle
Warriors"
"The Zucchini Warriors"
"MacDonald Hall Goes Hollywood"
"Something Fishy at MacDonald Hall"
by Gordon Korman
[children's fiction]

"Betsy and Tacy Go Downtown"  
by Maud Hart Lovelace
[children's fiction]

"Everything Happens to Stuey"
by Lilian Moore
[children's fiction]

"Every Day Is A Gift
Minute Meditations for Every Day
Taken From the Holy Bible
and the Writings of the Saints"
Introduction by Rev. Frederick Schroeder 
 daily devotional reading for 2016
 
 

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Books Read In The Past Week


Books read for the first time are marked with a #
Books are listed by author (or series creator),
 and not necessarily in the order read.

"Little Women"
by Louisa May Alcott
[fiction]
(In Kindle book, "The Complete Works of Louisa May Alcott")


"Black Becomes A Rainbow
The Mother of a Baal Teshuvah
Tells Her Story"
by Agi L.Bauer
[autobiography, Jewish]

"Mama's Way"
by Thyra Ferre Bjorn
[non-fiction, Christian Protestant)] 

"Claude Lightfoot
or How the Problem Was Solved"
by Fr. Francis J. Finn, S.J.
[children's fiction]
(free online book)
reserved for Sunday


"Go Jump In The Pool!"
"Beware The Fish"
by Gordon Korman
[children's fiction]

"Betsy and Tacy Go Over The Big Hill"  
by Maud Hart Lovelace
[children's fiction]


"Every Day Is A Gift
Minute Meditations for Every Day
Taken From the Holy Bible
and the Writings of the Saints"
Introduction by Rev. Frederick Schroeder 
 daily devotional reading for 2016
 
  

Clothes Shopping

I don't think I've ever blogged about clothes and clothes shopping before.   So now I'm going to blog about it.
To me, the most important question when it comes to deciding whether or not to buy an article of clothing is do I like it? If I like something, I'll wear it, whether it is the latest style, or completely unfashionable.  Of course, these days just about anything goes! One can develop a personal style.
Next: Is it modest, or would I be ashamed to have my Guardian Angel see me in it?
If it isn't modest, can it be worn OVER something that IS modest? Quite often, the answer is "yes."
Can I afford it?  I usually can, because I get my clothes second-hand. I have several reasons for this.  Yes, my budget has a great deal to do with it, but there are other considerations as well.  For one thing, it is better for the environment.  For another, I don't have to worry about where the item was manufactured.
 There used to be a stigma attached to buying and wearing second-hand clothes; thank God that's no longer the case! Now, one can sing with confidence:
"I'm wearing second hand clothes, second hand clothes."

Sunday, May 8, 2016

The Perfect Mother (Repost)

The Perfect Mother

Today, Mother's Day, I'm going to blog about the perfect mother. 
Most mothers, both real and fictional, are not perfect; they
make mistakes from time to time.  Not even Mrs. March
in Louisa May Alcott's Little Women was perfect.
The following is taken from one of my older posts:
Remember the chapter called "Jo Meets Apollyon," where
Amy burned the book Jo had worked on for several years
because Jo wouldn't let her come to the theater with her 
and Meg and Laurie?

Jo was, of course, furious with Amy... just as I would have been,
 just as almost anybody would have been.

But how did Mrs. March, Marmee, handle the situation?
"Mrs. March came home, and, having heard the story, 
soon brought Amy to a sense of the wrong she had done her sister."
That's it.  We never find out just how she "brought Amy to a
sense of the wrong she had done her sister."  We never learn
what Marmee said to Amy.

Mrs. March, in fact, seemed much more concerned about Jo's very
 understandable anger than about Amy's deliberate, vindictive 
destruction of Jo's property.

If I were a mother, I'm sure that I would not be perfect either.
For example, I might scold or punish a child undeservedly, or
too severely.  On the other hand, I might "look the other way"
when I ought to exercise some parental discipline.
In all the history of the world, there has been only one perfect Mother.


Saturday, May 7, 2016

Books Read In The Past Week

Books read for the first time are marked with a #
Books are listed by author (or series creator),
 and not necessarily in the order read.


"Mama's Way"
by Thyra Ferre Bjorn
[non-fiction, Christian Protestant)] 


Ramona's World"
by Beverly Cleary
[children's fiction]
(openlibrary.org loan)

"Harry Dee
or Making it  Out"
by Fr. Francis J. Finn, S.J.
[children's fiction]
(free online book)
reserved for Sunday

"This Can't Be Happening At MacDonald Hall!"
by Gordon Korman
[children's fiction]
(openlibrary.org loan)

"Betsy-Tacy and Tib"  
by Maud Hart Lovelace
[children's fiction]


"Penina Levine Is A Potato Pancake" 
"Penina Levine Is A Hard-Boiled Egg"
 by Rebecca O'Connell
[children's fiction, Judaica] 

"Davita's Harp"
by Chaim Potok
[fiction, Judaica]


"Every Day Is A Gift
Minute Meditations for Every Day
Taken From the Holy Bible
and the Writings of the Saints"
Introduction by Rev. Frederick Schroeder 
 daily devotional reading for 2016
 
  

"Happiness Is A Warm Puppy"
by Charles M. Schulz
[nonfiiction]
(openlibrary.org loan)  

"A Childhood at Green Hedges" #
by Imogen Smallwood
daughter of Enid Blyton
[autobiography, biography]
(openlibrary.org loan)



Friday, May 6, 2016

Liturgy Of The Hours: IBreviary or Books?

IBreviary is a wonderful resource, easy to use,and a great money-saver, so it will never be removed from this blog. 
I, however, prefer to use a physical copy of the Liturgy Of The Hours, for the following reasons:

1: Sometimes there is a power failure, and I can't use the computer, but I can always use the books, with a flashlight if need be.

The next two reasons involve my cat, Winky.

2: Sometimes Winky will be taking a nap on the computer chair.

3: Sometimes, when I used to pray the LOTH using IBreviary, Winky would get between me and the computer screen.

4: But the main reason is that I find that I concentrate better, pray better, with my eyes on the book rather than on the screen.